Partner Event: Changing the Culture for Open Data

On April 22, the Data Transparency Coalition and the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) Government Data Sharing Community of Practice co-hosted panel discussions focusing on the cultural change necessary for government agencies to embrace open data.

 Changing the Culture for Open Data

On April 22, the Data Transparency Coalition and the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) Government Data Sharing Community of Practice co-hosted panel discussions focusing on the cultural change necessary for government agencies to embrace open data. A short recap of the event can be found here.

Open data is the official policy of the U.S. government. President Obama issued his Open Data Policy on May 9, 2013, requiring executive agencies to publish their information as standardized, searchable data. On May 9, 2014, President Obama signed the unanimously-passed Digital Accountability and Transparency Act (DATA Act), which legally mandates this transformation for the federal government’s spending information. Open data requires agencies to adopt consistent data fields and formats for information that they collect, share, and disseminate – and then make that information fully available for everyone to use.

Even with a Presidential executive order covering all government information and a law mandating open data within spending, the transformation to open data is not an easy one. Wherever it has been successfully achieved, the transformation requires cultural change: a shift from documents-based to data-centric thinking.

Success stories come from wildly different areas of government and involve diverse types of information – from campsite availability at the Forest Service to geospatial information at the Department of the Interior. Yet these cultural changes share certain characteristics in common: all of them have needed strong championship from senior leaders, all of them have relied more on relationship-building than mandatory fiat, and all of them involved some internal benefit to be derived from the shift from documents to data.

This event will explore past success stories of open-data cultural change from across the government – and then dig into some key areas of government information where cultural change hasn’t happened yet, but might soon.

 

Agenda

1:30 pm — Welcome

Joah Iannotta, GAO
Hudson Hollister, Data Transparency Coalition
Ken Melero, Socrata

1:45 pm — Panel One: Stories of Cultural Change

Moderator: Joah Iannotta, GAO
Panelist: Rick DeLappe, Recreation One-Stop Program Manager, National Park Service, USDA
Panelist: Carrie Hug, Director of Accountability, Recovery Accountability and Transparency Board
Panelist: Camille Calimlim Touton, Counselor to the Assistant Secretary for Water and Science, Department of the Interior

3:00 pm — Break

3:30 pm — Panel Two: Future Challenges for Cultural Change

Moderator: Hudson Hollister, Data Transparency Coalition
Panelist: Raphael Majma, Innovation Specialist, 18F, GSA
Panelist: Joel Gurin, president, Center for Open Data Enterprise
Panelist: Jerry Johnston, PhD, Geospatial Information Officer, Department of the Interior

Register

 

Hosted by

GAO Logo
DTC Logo

Speakers

Rick DeLappe

Rick DeLappe

Recreation One-Stop Program Manager, National Park Service, USDA

Joel Gurin

Joel Gurin

President and Founder, Center for Open Data Enterprise

Hudson Hollister

Hudson Hollister

Executive Director, Data Transparency Coalition

Joah G. Iannotta, Ph.D.

Joah G. Iannotta, Ph.D.

Assistant Director, Forensic Audits and Investigative Service (FAIS), U.S. Government Accountability Office's (GAO)

Jerry Johnston, Ph.D.

Jerry Johnston, Ph.D.

Geospatial Information Officer, Department of the Interior

Camille Calimlim Touton

Camille Calimlim Touton

Counselor to the Assistant Secretary, Office of Water & Science, U.S. Department of the Interior

Carrie Hug

Carrie Hug

Director of Accountability, Recovery Accountability and Transparency Board

Raphael Majma

Raphael Majma

Innovation Specialist, 18F, GSA