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Posts tagged as ‘Financial Transparency Act


 

Open Data on Groundhog Day: Policy Reforms Bring Tech Change … Slowly


Last week, on Feb. 2, leaders from 22 tech companies fanned out across Capitol Hill. We crossed from Senate office buildings to House, and back again. We sat down with eight members of Congress and nine groups of staffers. We walked nearly ten miles. We ended our fourteen-hour day with a well-deserved beer. To enact our wonky agenda and realize our ambitious vision, we may have to invest many more Groundhog Days. But that’s okay. With each year of the same Capitol Hill treks and similar policy chats, real change is happening.

 

Open Data in the Age of Trump


FROM EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR HUDSON HOLLISTER: "We call on the new Trump Administration and the 115th Congress to enforce (and expand) the DATA Act, embrace a government-wide transformation of all information resources through the OPEN Government Data Act, and initiate regulatory reforms that use open data to reduce burdens, governed by the Financial Transparency Act and other reforms. I am optimistic that we will realize all three goals."

 

A Year in Review: The Data Coalition in 2016


It’s been a busy year for the world’s only open data trade association! We started a new sister organization, welcomed nearly two thousand people to our events, testified before Congress, and celebrated the Senate’s passage of landmark legislation. Our members made all this possible.

 

Fintech Leaders: Time to Modernize Financial Reporting


The Data Coalition and seven other financial and technology organizations today sent a letter to the Financial Services Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives requesting that the committee convene a hearing on the need for regulatory agencies to modernize the way they collect information from public companies, banks, markets, and financial firms.

 

Dutch Government Envisions “Business Reporting in Zero Clicks”


Why does the Data Transparency Coalition support the adoption of consistent data formats, such as XBRL, throughout regulatory reporting? If regulatory agencies standardized the information they collect, software could automate reporting, replacing layers of lawyers with lines of code - and the cost of compliance would drop. This is already happening in the Netherlands. Here's how.